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Issue 16

From the Bushfoods list...

PIB
Hello all,
With reference to John King's Email on a peak body for the Bushfood industry.
John you have raised some very good points. I would like to add my thoughts. There may be other people involved in this industry besides myself that would be a little disturbed about the lack of communication across the board on matters that can directly affect current and future investment in the industry. I had spent 9 years researching native food plants (muntries and wattle in particular) before I decided to go into our agri business Muntari Wild Food Plants and have been trading for 6 years. In that time little has changed in my enthusiasm for the potential of the industry, my opinions however, have. Some of us have had experience with the 'ANBIC' promise and it's eventual failure and do not wish to see that kind of fiasco repeated again. I am sure the "Umbrella group" have the best intentions and will not be able to please everyone all the time but I would ask a simple question. If this proposed association is to represent all interests, should the proposal not be posted to this list for all to see? This list I am sure was created for just this kind of discussion and it is capable of reaching a wide audience quickly. It need not be political nor ego driven discussion just plain old truth and facts should do, then everyone will know where they stand nationally. There are many factors and market niches that make up what we call "the Bushfoods Industry" and that's the great thing about it I guess, people from all walks of life can become involved with it. However,this can also work against the industry, what with wildly different prices for the same product,unreliable supply and food safety aspects still not completely convincing main stream markets we need to be very aware of just how young the industry is and give it all the help we can. No one has all the answers just yet and it is a leap of faith to invest hard dollars and plenty of time for some native food crops. We certainly need grower groups & associations at regional levels to give strong local support that will then give a solid foundation on which to build. We also require government to get serious and realise the potential of this industry and not just wander around the peripheral. I know there is research funding, CSIRO & RIRDC involment etc but a few hundred thousand dollars here and there for an industry that RIRDC estimates
should be valued around $100 million per year within 5 years? Who is setting the agenda for Bushfoods in this country? Do you want to Know? Do you you need to Know? Do you want to have a say? How will you be able to voice your opinions? What safety or quality procedures do you need to follow? If you are a member of an association eg: the Quandong Association, questions like the above could be answered and your opinions no doubt heard. Government will usually listen to a collective well organised group more readily than any individual. Marketing produce is generally easier and the experience of a collective can be tapped into when required. Research dollars may be more readily available also.
I would like to see the following:
a) Regional grower groups. Why? Local shared site knowledge readily accessible. Growers with mixed plantings can be a member of one or more associations.
b) Associations for each fruit group. Why? Each fruit etc has it's own set of problems and I doubt a national body could fill the requirements of all sector's problems in an effect way.
c) National body. Why? Focal point for research $ and marketing which this industry requires and I doubt if government will like the hassle of dealing with smaller associations when it comes to funding projects.
I strongly believe that for this industry to be both economically and ethically sustainable there needs to be both decicive and timely action on all levels of management, be it production,marketing or research. Failure to respond to any of these things will see our fledgling industry offshore quicker than you may think possible. Israel already is very keen on the quandong and Africa and the US on wattleseed.
Cheers for now
Brian King,

Brian
You have raised some good points and I thank you for that. I have long wondered how best we can help each other in terms of many types of bushfoods. Because what one person will need may not interest another or be of any assistance.
I think the development of different plant groups is helpful so long as we are able to encompass the many plant varieties.
Jenni Weekes

Dear List
I would just like to add a few comments to the ongoing discussion about a Peak Industry Body (PIB) - 1. The history of PIBs are that they are only effective when they are truly
representative, and are recognised as such both within and without the industry. Further, PIBs that do not have the support of major industry players are never effective and, even with the best of intentions, groupings do not really become PIBs just because they announce that they are.
2. Many significant industry players, nationwide, are not currently members of 'Bushfood Associations' and have little interest in such organizations, but instead closely associate with their commercial market channel partners. As far as I can see these market channel partnerships are seemly being ignored by current PIB proposals, and in turn these partnerships are probably ignoring current PIB discussions.
3. The industry in South Australia is developing rapidly without the benefit of an umbrella organization, which seems to indicate that such groupings are not necessarily fundamental to industry growth and development.
4. Many native citrus growers, who also grow conventional citrus, do not necessarily see a 'Bushfood Association' or 'Bushfood PIB' as representing their interests, instead considering the Australian Citrus Growers and their regional/state citrus bodies as the appropriate organizations. Considering the well established and effective nature of these organizations one wonders if there is any need at all to have parallel 'bushfood' structures for native citrus.
5. Given that, even in levy-paying rural industries, a significant proportion of R&D funds comes from the tax-payer it is unrealistic to expect that Government will not have a significant say in how that money is spent.
Industries simply can't say 'give us the money and we will decide how it is spent'. 6. There are many paradigms around for what the 'bushfood' industry is all about (even the name is subject to dispute). Is it fundamentally about wild harvest, cultivation, polyculture, permaculture, organic production, biodynamics, monoculture, agribusiness, cooperatives, bioregionalism, export, community consumption, biodiversity, genetic purity, cottage
industry, niche products, mainstream products, indigenous involvement, indigenous ownership, indigenous intellectual property, commercial intellectual property or a combination of these and perhaps other factors?
Given this diversity of industry models it is hard to see how any PIB can be both representative and coherent and it may be necessary for some of these paradigms to largely fall by the wayside before a PIB is really feasible.
7. If reform of the current RIRDC decision-making process is really the main aim of PIB proposals perhaps aspirations should be confined to this more modest and achievable aim, rather than trying to tackle it through a PIB (although I believe the caveats under my point 6 still apply).
8. Personal or (unsupported and ill-informed) professional-competence attacks, even if veiled as 'viewpoints' or 'constructive comments', are unlikely to progress the issue much, though one tends to reap what one sows.
Anthony Hele
Industry Development Consultant - Native Foods, ANPI/PIRSA
Ph: 08 8595 8129 Fax: 08 8595 8099 Mob: 0408 754 426
Email: crop_advice@anpi.com.au Web: www.anpi.com.au

Hello all,
With reference to John King's Email on a peak body for the Bushfood
industry. John you have raised some very good points. I would like to add my thoughts. There may be other people involved in this industry besides myself that would be a little disturbed about the lack of communication across the board on matters that can directly affect current and future investment in the industry. I had spent 9 years researching native food plants (muntries and wattle in particular) before I decided to go into our agri business
Muntari Wild Food Plants and have been trading for 6 years. In that time
little has changed in my enthusiasm for the potential of the industry, my opinions however, have.
Some of us have had experience with the 'ANBIC' promise and it's eventual
failure and do not wish to see that kind of fiasco repeated again.
I am sure the "Umbrella group" have the best intentions and will not be able
to please everyone all the time but I would ask a simple question.
If this proposed association is to represent all interests, should the
proposal not be posted to this list for all to see? This list I am sure was created for just this kind of discussion and it is capable of reaching a wide audience quickly. It need not be political nor ego driven discussion just plain old truth and facts should do, then everyone will know where they stand nationally. There are many factors and market niches that make up what we call "the Bushfoods Industry" and that's the great thing about it I guess, people from all walks of life can become involved with it. However, this can also work against the industry, what with wildly different prices for the same product, unreliable supply and food safety aspects still not completely convincing main stream markets we need to be very aware of just how young the industry is and give it all the help we can. No one has all the answers just yet and it is a leap of faith to invest hard dollars and plenty of time for some native food
crops. We certainly need grower groups & associations at regional levels to give strong local support that will then give a solid foundation on which to build. We also require government to get serious and realise the potential of this industry and not just wander around the peripheral. I know there is research funding, CSIRO & RIRDC involvement etc but a few hundred thousand dollars here and there for an industry that RIRDC estimates should be valued around $100 million per year within 5 years? Who is setting the agenda for Bushfoods in this country? Do you want to Know? Do you need to know? Do you want to have a say? How will you be able to voice your opinions? What safety or quality procedures do you need to follow? If you are a member of an association eg: the Quandong Association, questions like the above could be answered and your opinions no doubt heard. Government will usually listen to a collective well organised group more readily than any individual. Marketing produce is generally easier and the experience of a collective can be tapped into when required. Research dollars may be more readily available also.
I would like to see the following:
a) Regional grower groups .
Why? Local shared site knowledge readily accessible.Growers with mixed plantings can be a member of one or more associations.
b) Associations for each fruit group. Why? Each fruit etc has it's own set of problems and I doubt a national body could fill the requirements of all sector's problems in an effect way.
c) National body
Why? Focal point for research $ and marketing which this industry requires and I doubt if government will like the hassle of dealing with smaller associations when it comes to funding projects.
I strongly believe that for this industry to be both economically and ethically sustainable there needs to be both decicive and timely action on all levels of management, be it production,marketing or research. Failure to respond to any of these things will see our fledgling industry offshore quicker than you may think possible. Israel already is very keen on the quandong and Africa and the US on wattleseed.
Further to comments on R&D and Peak industry bodies.
I agree that egos and personality clashes should remain well away from this
list. It serves no purpose other than to distract from important issues.
However, people are entitled to ask the hard questions of any person or group who puts themselves into a position of representing others interests, such is life.
I do not say there is backroom dealings and the like, what I do say is there is a lack of communication channels on important issues facing this industry.
On an R&D council, sounds good but I would like to see more details.
Cheers for now
Brian King
Muntari Wild Food Plants Of Australia

Dear Sammy and listees,
I've been following this discussion with great interest - with a different hat on (chairman of an essential oil grower coop) I have been involved with RIRDC since it was invented; canvassing research priorities with growers, collaborating with research providers to put forward preliminary and full proposals and helping to formulate the last RIRDC Research Plan in that industry.
I endorse John King's comments about a reasoned development of the research
plan; some parts of the public face of our industry would make any self- respecting bureaucrat charged with administering public funds, run a mile.
Here's my one suggestion to guide the discussion: minimise the prominence of complicated personal and political agendas - they foment rebellion, and as we can all see, the 'Bushfood Industry' needs all the cohesion it can get.
Focus on R & D issues which are broad based, and foundation building and avoid mixing up ideological positions on (for example) environmental management in a plan to identify research priorities in the first instance.
Mixed agendas make civil servants nervous. (Don't mistake me - these matters are fundamental- but there will be one position for every speaker on the subject, and this stuff needs time and space to evolve. The priority is to get something on the ground around which we can base ideological discussions in the future.)
Most importantly - more power to Sammy in her efforts to keep the conversations flowing. In the scheme of things, work like this is probably just as important as a well funded research program!!
Chris Read
Diemen Pepper

I totally support everything that Brian King has to say about industry bodies. They need to be effective and to do that they have to be inclusive, not an
exclusive, secretive club working for the benefit of a few.
We will lose our industry overseas if we are too slow or too silly to get our act together - look what happened to the macadamia!
Regional groups are the go - I'm still interested in hearing from anyone in the Taree area, or indeed people involved or interested in bushfoods from
anywhere on the mid-north coast and Hunter Valley. A local information exchange could develop into such a regional body if enough people are interested.
David Williams
Taree Australia
Teacher, Permaculturalist and Bush Food Designer

ABORIGINAL INVOLVEMENT

You may think it funny, but, as moderator of this list, I actually take it personally when the chatter 'quietens down' and there is little traffic. I am chuffed that the issue of indigenous involvement has brought out some conversation. As a small time grower and 'street harvester', I am not quite sure how I can lend energy to greater participation by Aboriginal people in what is,
after all, their food. However, I do know that we should be talking about it, canvassing opinions, arguing and sharing thoughts now, not later.
I'll be blunt - I have come across two nearly opposing camps - those people who feel that some form of Aboriginal ownership is paramount and we should all work together now - and those who feel that the black fella will wait until there is some major success and then want a cut.
I don't feel either argument really addresses the reality - a small, embryonic industry which is geographically isolated, based (largely) on cottage industry, noted for its distinct lack of 'real' success stories and still struggling to come together and really produce a product - and some sustainable profits.
I don't think there is any ready-built bridge to encourage Aboriginal involvement. I don't think the majority of people in the industry would even know where to begin.
I have a concept I'll throw in - perhaps we should formally allocate wild harvest rights to Aboriginal communities, along with the onus of sustainability and economic viability. The quid pro quo would be no food right or cultural heritage claims upon plantation grown bushfoods. There is a precedent for this in Canadian wild rice. Well, that's enough for a Thursday evening -
speak up!
I miss the messages.
Sammy Ringer,
Moderator

Hi Sammy, I am working with the Yulngi people of Wulkibimirri and Murwangi in North-Central Arnhemland. I have been here for two years now. We are setting up a small trial garden and nursery at Wulkibimirri and at Murwangi (which is an Aboriginal owned cattle station) we are looking to do some native grass, legume and fodder tree revegetation.
Matthew Bunenyerra

Dear List
I am also starting to work with aboriginal people and bushfoods, in the Taree area. I first became interested in bushfoods when I lived in Maleny so I'd love to know whats happening up there. It seems very few aboriginal people are involved in the "bushfood industry" although it based on their knowledge and the plants that they have used for tens of thousands of years.
As a high school teacher I thought that Bushfoods could be a good subject to pursue, with both Koori and non-Koori children. I'm starting a short program, covering both traditional and commercial uses of bushfoods, including a planting at the school (Chatham High). Hopefully this will lead to bigger and better things, and more aboriginal people reconnecting with their traditional knowledge, as well as gaining possible employment in an industry that connects them with their culture.
David Williams
Taree Australia
Teacher, Permaculturalist and Bush Food Designer

Sammy et al
The sooner we stop thinking and talking in terms of 'our' food and 'their' food the sooner native foods will become a part of the mainstream food industry. Rather than trying to come up with conciliatory measure that give us the warm and fuzzies, let's try to harness the knowledge within the Aboriginal community, recognise the cultural significance many native foods and bring these components together to create an edge in the food market.
This can only happen if we, as Australians, work together and all add value to this thing we are trying tp create. At the risk of be labelled an economist, I say that the only way groups/industries/etc can sustain an involvement in a system is if they add value (in some way) to that system.
It is pointless for one group (the 'whites') to say we must involve another group (the 'Kooris') in the native food industry if, (a) that group does not wish to be involved and/or (b) that group does not add value to the industry in the 21C world.
Let's face it, in the mainstream food industry, the really compelling things about native foods are the stories behind them, their role in Aboriginal culture, etc (i.e the things that can't be copied or artificially synthesised) and, to a lesser extent, their flavour/texture/etc.
If generic 'native foods' are to be widely accepted they need to be able to compete (in terms of value, not price) with competitor products, and this won't be helped by a division of 'ownership'. In the absurd, the natural extension of the concept of ownership of the native food system is that Aboriginal people should be excluded from participating in non-traditional Aboriginal industries (e.g. cattle, sheep, farming, etc). This is too ludicrous to contemplate.
I'm not sure what the answer is but am sure that it does not lie in further division of industries, resources, etc.
Regards
Hugh Macintosh

Hi all,
Lee, it's been my experience that the commercial bushfood industry in coastal NSW has had very little aboriginal involvement. Of course aboriginal people are part of the bushfood "scene" - it's their "scene" and their traditional foods. But commercially, aboriginal involvement is small. Greater involvement of aboriginal people in the development of the bushfood industry would ensure culturally appropriate development of bushfoods and an economic livelihood for aboriginal communities.
Without direct involvement, aboriginal communities will fail to share in the future profits of the bushfoods industry. This means that they have to own and manage the plantations and processors etc. If they are to really benefit.
Of course, there are many projects that I am not aware of and I am encouraged to hear that aboriginal people are getting involved in other areas of the country.
Lee, I'm very interested in the landcare programs you mentioned using bushfoods. I pictured using bushfoods as part of a landcare planting with harvesting rights allowed? Is this the sort of thing you plan to do? It sounds excellent.
Dave Williams

G'day listees,
In fact, there are a lot of Aboriginal people involved with the bushfoods industry, perhaps they are just not as vocal as the members of this list. Our bush tomatos and some of our wattle seed is harvested by Aboriginal people on their traditional lands when it is available. I know that many processors and industry members are actively seeking more Aboriginal involvement and there is nothing stopping people from all cultures & backgrounds getting involved. Locally, my business is assisting the Dharuk people establish and plan a bushfoods plantation and some innovative landcare programs involving bushfoods. In the medium term we hope to source the bulk of some of our produce locally, with funds being returned to local Aboriginal businesses and conservation programs for further work. In my experience Aboriginal people in western Sydney are more involved with the final use of bushfoods at a consumer and food srvice/catering & tourism level than in growing, processing & sourcing produce (the very vocal & frantic section of the industry & the main focus of this list). I'm sure as you get more involved with your local Aboriginal communities you will realize that they are very much a part of the local bushfoods scene and
always have been. Its just us commercially focused people who make all the noise!
Lee Etherington
B.Sc (Environmental Management & Tourism)
Operations Manager
Local Focus Nature Tours & Kurrajong Australian Native Foods

---------------------
At the Sept Davidsonia Industry Association meeting Maria Matthes from the NSW NPWS brought us up to date with licencing for the collection of NSW Davidsonia species from the wild. A draft plan has been put together with guidelines for collection. This document comprises of a set of guidelines which, if followed during wild-harvest, will minimise (and monitor) the impact of this action so as to not significantly affect the threatened species. Since the meeting the guidelines have been reviewed and the final draft will be available very soon.
These guidelines will be attached to a section 91 License application and referred to throughout the application. A Section 95 certificate will be issued rather than a Section 91 License. A Section 95 certificate is issued where there is not likely to be a detrimental effect on the species or habitat.
The licensing for wild plums is seen as an interim measure and will only be available for the next 3-5 years by which time it is expected that there will be enough cultivated plants in production to meet the markets needs.
Any complaints made to NPWS must be followed up. If a person is found wild-harvesting Davidson Plums and has no coverage in the form of a section 95 certificate then they will be prosecuted under the threatened species conservation act. Current schedules to the threatened species conservation act are available in PDF form at
http://www.npws.nsw.gov.au/wildlife/tscs00.htm
Licenses will also be required for people wishing to collect material from any of the listed plants on the schedule. Diploglottis campbellii - small leaved tamarind is included. Maria is now working on guidelines for the collection of propagation material from the scheduled species occurring in Northern NSW which will also be available soon.
If you have any enquiries or require a license contact
Maria Matthes, NPWS Locked bag 914, Coffs Harbour 2450
or email maria.matthes@npws.nws.gov.au
Deb Wood (Davidsonia Ind Ass)

Re nutritional values for bushfood plants, not everyone may know of this
very useful reference:
Brand Miller J, James KW & Maggiore P M A (1993). Tables of Composition of
Australian Aboriginal Foods. Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra.
Various libraries have it. It summarises large sets of results of nutritional analyses of a wide range of Australian bushfoods, in text and spreadsheets. It shows how much protein, fat, carbohydrate, dietary fibre etc. were in one or often several samples, how many kilojoules (energy value) and also the values for some major elements including sodium, potassium, phosphorus, and for some species the minor elements copper, lead and cadmium etc.
Best regards, Merv & Elwyn Hegarty, Plantchem Pty Ltd.

Dear List,
Bushfoods in WA - the website is now out there, at the following address: http://www.geocities.com/nativefoodswa/main.htm
I haven't publicized it yet as there are a few bugs to get out but if you use the hotkeys on the left frame: "Bushfoods in WA" then "Events" you will get to the proceedings. As you will see, about half the contributors have not contributed proceedings to this date (what can you do!!?), but you can see what we have.
Would welcome comments and particularly new information to add to the website. Would you like to add your upcoming paper to the website? Please consider letting the discussion group know what is happening in your part of WA - I would be interested for one!
Regards and thanks,
Helen Coleman

As a follow-up to the Native Foods Seminar held at Muresk, WA in April 2000 an email discussion group has been created. The focus of the group will be on sharing information and ideas about bushfoods and the development of the industry in WA.
If you would like to join the group, just go to the sign-up page at http://NativeFoodsWA.listbot.com/
Regards,
Helen Coleman

 

G'day David & listers,
In fact there are a lot of Aboriginal people involved with the bushfoods industry, perhaps they are just not as vocal as the members of this list.
Our bush tomatoes and some of our wattle seed is harvested by Aboriginal people on their traditional lands when it is available. I know that many processors and industry members are actively seeking more Aboriginal involvement and there is nothing stopping people from all cultures & backgrounds getting involved. Locally, my business is assisting the Dharuk people establish and plan a bushfoods plantation and some innovative landcare programs involving bushfoods. In the medium term we hope to source the bulk of some of our produce locally, with funds being returned to local Aboriginal businesses and conservation programs for further work. In my experience Aboriginal people in western Sydney are more involved with the final use of bushfoods at a consumer and food service/catering & tourism level than in growing, processing & sourcing produce (the very vocal & frantic section of the industry & the main focus of this list). I'm sure as you get more involved with your local Aboriginal communities you will realize that they are very much a part of the local bushfoods scene and always have been. Its just us commercially focused people who make all the noise!
In Western Sydney we have some members of the Dharuk people (Hawkesbury Valley) involved with interps & end use. There is also Sharon Williams from the Ngemba tribe (western nsw) who runs Thullii Aboriginal performers & products based in Rooty Hill www.thullii.com.au Sharon does bushtucker catering. Some Dharuk people have just received a couple of Ha to plant out so they will then be progressing to growers & harvesters soon.
Lee Etherington
B.Sc (Environmental Management & Tourism)
Operations Manager
Local Focus Nature Tours & Kurrajong Australian Native Foods
Visit us on the Web! www.naturetours.com.au
Ph: 61 (0) 2 4567 7000
Lee Etherington

Good-day
I would suggest that growers, harvesters, and processors have a look at the anzfa.gov.au web site, the final draft will go before Ministerial Council late November, and if passed become law from then with a 2 year changeover. Read the labelling laws, and the section on novel foods, interesting reading as this is part of where Bushfood would fit in. I guess though it depends on their definition of "Traditional usage".
The toxicological report into the main(14?, need to find my notes) bushfood plants and components was recommended at the Canberra conference in about 94 or 95 to be included in the Research Plan for the Bushfood Industry. The Davidson Plum Association are working on the generic HACCP. Both will be necessary under the act. The part we failed to foresee is a nutritional breakdown of the foods for labeling, although a lot of that data is available if one searches.
Our wild foods are generally more nutritional, a lot of Vic's early work will come in handy.
I priced a program just for logging and recording your critical control points, it had to come from Canada at $3000 dollars. Needless to say I will struggle and do my documentation by hand. The gist of it is a paper trail from grower-harvester to consumer. Points at which hazards may occur, and documenting the control of those hazard points throughout the entire food chain. It is all for our own good.
If you just want to grow and eat, you are fine. Anyone contemplating the next step needs to know these laws as the idea is to control health hazzards. Note: food home cooked for charity events need not have nutritional data, but must have allergen data on the label. John

Fellow Bushfooders,
I understand that this idea of an 'AUSTRALIAN' produce should not cost as much as imported produce. But then again I think we also have to understand, that the
industry at the moment is largely reliant on wild harvest - and the people who take their time out to 'go bush' need to be righfully compensated for their time and efforts. And the price of the bushfoods we pay for reflect these high production costs. These prices would quite obviously come down with production costs - but they can't drop too much as this gives a prejudicial 'cheap' image. I think as more and more bushfood crops become cultivated we will begin to see some of the production costs (and subsequent cost to the consumer) go down.
Although, the profit margin on most bushfoods products are quite low to the
actual producers, many are reliant on return business (as do all other businesses) to support them, so for their own livelihood they can't really ask for a price lower than production costs (obviously).
Mary also mentioned about ANZFA standards. As far as I know there are none
in place at the moment. however, toxicology tests have been (or are being)
made on several crops such as wattleseed and native peppermint. RIRDC are
planning HACCP practices for most production situations.
Ray

Dear List
Please feel free to check out our web page at http://home.vicnet.net.au/~bushfood/
We welcome your feedback about the site and our association...
Our newsletter has been published for quite some time with Issue 22 due out
in October. Back copies are available for $10 + postage from our president David
Thompson email: dinkum@netconnect.com.au.
We look forward to hearing from Southern enthusiasts...and anyone with a
taste for the unique foods of Australia.
David Thompson
Southern Bushfood Ass.

Hello List,
I am a high school teacher and I've been asked to write an article on Bush Tucker in an educational magazine. To help me in my preparation, I invite list members to respond to the following questions.
1. Why should we teach high school students about Bush Tucker?
2. What are the main issues (ethical, environmental, financial, etc.) facing the Bushfoods industry?
3. If you are a teacher already teaching Bush Tucker to high school students, what are the things that you emphasize, and what are the kinds of responses you get?
4. If you are involved in eco-tourism or some other kinds of public relations with the general community, what are the most amazing questions you are asked, or the most amazing responses you get?
Please reply to peterrjo@bit.net.au
Thanks,
Peter Jones
www.teachers.ash.org.au/bushtucker/

G'day Peter,
In my experience:
1. that its not all burnt lizard and not everything in the bush will kill you.
Your local cultural values of bushfood:
High in trace elements minerals and other health promoting compounds. There is enough food in most environments for a family to survive on, how to identify all of it is the hard part
2. Genetic quality of production plants
Industry image problems (witjuti grubs, burnt lizard, poisonous berries etc)
Produce transport issues
Seasonality
Unreliable production of native plants
Quality control processes at all stages of production
4. Questions: you name it, many people think Lilly Pilly berries are poisonous, prob due to parents educating them from childhood not to eat the berries (similar to the 'don't go near the dam because a crocodile lives in there' syndrome but people haven't learnt that it is a myth with the lilly pillys...)
Many people who taste the foods don't believe that it is actually made using native foods because of the images mentioned above.
I have found on our tours that some people have brought lunch along with them in a concealed bag because they were terrified that the food would be inedible. They have not told me this until after the tour when they also reveal that they were astonished at the quality and appeal of the foods. They are always embarrassed!
"But He's not Black!!!"
some people loose control at the spectacular taste and appeal of our products and walk away after the tour with $150 of jams etc.
many people need to hear things two or three times before they believe it. This gets very monotonous at a trade show with 30000 people!
Above all, make it fun and plant a lilly pilly tree at your school!
Regards,
Lee Etherington

Hi Sammy and Bushfooders,
All this talk of a R&D body seems to have come at the perfect time, although I have not much to contribute at the moment, I am hoping that you can all help me with some information on WHERE the bushfoods industry is currently (in terms of research - how much money allocated, problems [obstacles] in obtaining funds [including the issue regarding 'peak body'], what research is being done; marketing and promotions, future trends and opportunities,&c).
I am requiring this information for an Honours paper, but if you are interested I could post the finished version on the list.
Your replies can be emailed to me directly (at rayma@one.net.au) or posted
through the list. Thankyou all and hope to hear from you all soon.
Kind regards
Ray

A company in North Queensland will be processing green ants. These are used
to marinate dishes such as barramundi, which is currently processed by this
company in Cairns.
Contact: Max Panachini
Panachini Gourmet Foods
Tel: 0740 578220
Regards,
Jacquie Bodger
AgriInfonet
Rural Market Development
DPI - Queensland
Tel: 07 3239 3307

Hi Anthony and list.
In answer to a couple of your questions about A. retinodes, yes it is commercially viable and the price can vary just as in other native foods. If you sell at farm gate price you should not expect much more than $8 to $9 per kilo but that is actually quite good.
If you value add then you may get $20-$25 per kilo but your intended market(s) will be the real acid test so my advise is to knock on a few doors and see if you can sell it first. We have plantings of this and other Acacia species and would rate this second on the ladder to A. victoriae. As to planting A. victoriae in 1100mm and irrigating, I would suggest you would not need to irrigate very often as our experience with this species shows it survives and produces well with less than 400mm annual rainfall. It is a dryland species so you need to emulate the natural habitat rather than force it to perform too far out of it's climatic range.
The timber of A. retinodes is quite straight and at first appearances, looks good for fence post material but it's density is quite low so perhaps someone else out there in cyberspace can tell us if it is of any commercial use.
Hope all goes well with your plantings
Regards
Brian King
Muntari wild Food Plants Of Australia
Can anyone share their ideas on good potting mixes for bushfoods?
I've got lots of plants needing potting up - haven't got anywhere to plant them yet!
David Williams

G'day David,
I do a lot of propagating of native plants up here in the Burdekin. My mix
is 4 parts peat moss, 4 parts sand, and 1 part vermiculite or perlite.
Throw in a couple of handfuls of osmacote and things grow beautifully. The
same mix( minus the fert) will also work for seed germination. Happy
potting.
Cheers,
Peter Alden
Greening Australia (Queensland)

Hi,
I just use coco-peat 90% / perlite 10%. There is little nutrient in this medium but it allows me to play with different brews.
Works for me.
Sandro


Surfing...

Just a few sites for the inveterate surfers... (please note - links have not been checked! means link is broken)

Acacia, www.anbg.gov.au/bibliography/acacia-wattle.html and

www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1996/v3-228.html

Australian Dry-zone Acacias for Human Food (CSIRO)

www.ffp.csiro.au/tigr/atscmain/whatwedo/publications/acfoodbk.htm

Australian Ethnoecology: www.bigpond.com/bushguide/

Australian Food and Grocery Council, www.afgc.org.au/

Australian Native Plants Forum, www.au.gardenweb.com/forums/oznative/

Australian New Crops www.uq.edu.au/~gagkrego

Australian Plants Online: www.ozemail.com.au/~sgap

Blue Gum Fine Foods, www.users.bigpond.com/matterhorn.htm

Bush Food Methods of growing, www.nor.com.au/community/organic/library/farmplan/bushfood.htm

Bush Food Plants for Northern NSW,  www.greenwork.org.au/bfood.htm

Bush food production, www.greenwork.org.au/bushfood.htm

Bush Heritage, www.ausgeo.com.au/

Emerging Indigenous Crops of Australia, www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1996/v3-026.html

Florabank, www.florabank.org.au/

CSIRO work with native foods: http://www.cse.csiro.au/research/nativefoods/

HerbNET, Main Page www.herbnet.com/

Heritage Seed Curators' Association, http://www.genevar.com.au/seedsavers/resources/35.html

Lemon myrtle, www.ffp.csiro.au/publicat/articles/lemon.htm

Medicinal herbs www.sunsite.unc.edu/herbmed/faqs/mediherb.txt

Native flora, home.vicnet.net.au/~iffa/welcome.htm

Oz Gardens on Line, www.dejanews.com/~ozgardens/~ozgardens/

Production of bushfoods, www.greenwork.org.au/bushfood.htm

Purdue new crop page, www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/home

Quandong, www.biodiversity.environment.gov.au/plants/manageme/maldong.htm

Quandong, http://farrer.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/APOL7/sep97-1.html

http://farrer.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/APOL7/sep97-2.html

http://www.nullarbornet.com.au/themes/quandongs.html

http://www.nectarbrook.com/quandong/tree.html

http://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2002/santalum-acuminatum.html

Quandong recipe: http://www.benjaminchristie.com/recipe/67/quandong-jam

Aborignal use of native foods: http://science.uniserve.edu.au/school/curric/stage4_5/nativeplants/gallery/quandong/

Aust Quandong Industry Ass: www.users.centralonline.com.au/aqia/

RIRDC,www.rirdc.gov.au/programs/

Taste of the Bush (Melb. Uni): www.arts.unimelb.edu.au/amu/ucr/student/1997/silva/

 

 

 

 

From the Editor

Comment

From Mary King

Letters

Gold Fields Bushfoods

Wild Harvest News

What's the right price?

Opportunities

Plant Hardiness Zones

Oops column

Lesser known species

RIRDC R&D

Wattleseed Feature

Sell Before You Sow

Citrus...

New Plant Names

Production Info...

Products

Book Review

Recipes

Web sites

Groups

Classifieds

From the List

Groups

Arid Land Growers Ass Inc

Graham Herde

Nectar Brooks Station via

Port Augusta

SA 5700

Ph: 08 8634 7 077

South East Sustainable Bushfood Industry Group

Secretary: Terence Carpenter

443 Kameruka Lane

Candelo NSW 2550

Ph: 02 64 932 227

Fax: 0264 932 225

Southern Bushfood Association

President: David Thompson,

RMB 7390A Wartook VIC 3401

Ph/fax: 03 5383 6247

email: dinkumfare@hotmail.com

General membership: $35 pa

Commercial membership: $50 pa

6 newsletters per year

Southen Vales Bushfood Ass.

Mike Brandwood

PO Box 344

Clarendon, SA 5157

Ph: 08 8383 6481

email: brandwood@picknowl.com.au

 

Australian Plants Society Web Page:

http://farrer.riv.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/

 

Bio-Dynamic Farming & Gardening Assoc. in Aust

PO Box 54 BELLINGEN NSW 2454 Ph: (066) 55-0404

Fax: (066) 55-0399

 

Canberra Organic Growers Society (COGS)

PO Box 347 Dickson, ACT 2602

email: cogs@netspeed.com.au

 

Tree Crops Centre

PO Box 27, Subiaco, WA 6008

Phone: (08) 9388 1965

Fax: (08) 9388 1852

 

Australian Plants Society

Food Study Group

Lenore Lindsay:

323 Philp Ave

Frenchville

QLD 4701

Newsletter

Society for Growing Australian Plants Queensland region:

PO Box 586

Fortitude Valley

Qld 4006

Ordinary m'ship: $37 pa

Student: $29 pa

web page: www.sgapqld.org.au

Native Food Growers Group Inc

Elizabeth Shannon

1358 Triamble Rd

Hargraves NSW 2850

Fax: 0263 738 636

 

Queensland Bushfood

Association

Chair - John King.

Ph: 07 3284 2202

email: jrmrk@bytesite.com.au

 

Southern Bushfoods Ass:

RMB 7390A, Wartook, Vic 3401

Ph: 03 5383v 6247

dinkum@netconnect.com.au

Very established group. Newsletter and meetings.

 

Australian Native Bee Research Centre

Promotes the preservation and enjoyment of Australian native bees. Publishes 'Aussie Bee'.

PO Box 74

North Richmond, NSW 2754

Fax: 02 4576 1196

email: anbrc@zeta.org.au

Australian Quandong

Industry Association Inc

President:

Robin Schaefer

PO Box 236

Upper Sturt, SA 5156

Ph: 08 8584 7781.

Fax: 08 8584 6350

Bio-Dynamic Agriculture Association

PO POWELLTOWN VIC 3797

Ph: 03 5966 7 333

Fax: 03 5966 7433

 

Biological Farmers of Australia

PO Box 3404

Toowoomba Village Fair

Qld 4350

Ph: (0746) 393 299

Fax: (0746) 393 755

Organic Herb Growers of Australia Inc

P.O. Box 6171 

SOUTH LISMORE NSW 2480.

Ph: (066) 291 057

 

Davidsonia Industry Ass.

Daryl: davoplum@webmongrel.com

Membership: $25

PO Box 770 Burringbar 2483.

Henry Doubleday Research Ass.

816 Comleroy Rd Kurrajong NSW 2758

Est. 1970 to promote organic methods and principles in gardening and farming.

Great newsletter.

 

Australian Plants Society

NSW

PO Box 744

Blacktown NSW2148

Publishes 'Australian Plants' and 'Native Plants for NSW'

Ph: 02 9621 3437

Fax: 02 9676 7603

Bushfood Plants Found here...

St Kilda Indigenous Nursery

Coastal species - phone for full

species list.

03 9645 2477

525 Williamstown Rd,

Port Melbourne

Yeppoon Rainforest Nursery

Native rainforest species.

Bushfood plants. W'sale & retail

Ph/fax: 0749 393 963

Mobile: 0419 683 157

PO Box 109 Yeppoon 4703

 

Yuruga Native Plants

Specialist growers of native plants (including bushfoods) for Northern Aust. Phone for price list:

07 4093 3826

Kennedy Highway, 

Walkamin

Qld  4872

Edible Gardens

Permaculture nursery with a large range of edible native and rainforest plants

37 Bangalla St, Auchenflower

Ph: 07 3720 8950

Cornucopia Nursery

Wide range of species

55 Station St, Mullumbimby NSW 2482.

Enquiries:

web site:

http://users.mullum.com.au/~botanica

email: botanica@mullum.com.au

Bush Nuts Native Nursery

A propagation/wholesale nursery with over 200 rainforest and rainforest margin species

64 Syndicate Rd

Tallebudgera Valley 4228

Ph/fax: 0755 338 105

 

South Coast Flora

Species suitable for temperate/cool climates, including: Illawarra plum, Mountain pepper, Cool climate Syzygium spp, native herbs and teas.

146 Dignam's Creek Rd, Via Cobargo NSW 2550

Phone: 026 493 6747

Nector Brook Discovery Plantation

Santalum spicatum (Australian Sandalwood) Propagated to order for Autumn and Spring planting. In biodegradable tubes with host plants. $3.50 each.

Box 393 Port Augusta 5700

Ph/Fax: 0886 347 077

 

Royston Petrie Seeds

Large range of edible Acacia 

Bunya Pine, Brachychiton, Cissus, Syzygium, Lomandra, Macadamia, Podocarpus, Santalum.

Phone for full seed list.

Ph: 02 9654 1186.

Fax: 02 9654 2658

77 Kenhurst Rd, Kenthurst, NSW 2156

SPIRIT OF THE RAINFOREST

Growers of Davidson's Plum - NSW species.

Ph: 02 65647426

e-mail: nahele@midcoast.com.au

'Nahele', McHughs Creek Road,

via Bowraville, NSW, 2449.

 

Lemon Myrtle Ground Leaf

$33.27 per kg -

premium quality.

Certified ANSAS (chemical residue free). Also avialable in a variety of cuts and forms.

Contact

Bushfoods of

Australia:

Ph: 02 6687 1005

Fax: 02 6687 1358

email: bushfood@anfm.com.au

Barung Landcare Nursery...

Maleny, Qld

A wide selection of

rainforest bushfood

species.

Contact us for a listing:

Ph: 07 5494 3151

Fax: 07 5494 3141

email:

barung@sun.big.net.au

Tasmanian Garden Design

and

Consultancy

Bushfood

horticulture

consultant and

specialist grower of Tasmanian Native Plants.

Kris Schaffer

Dip. Art., Cert. Hort., MAIH

Ph/Fax: 03 6239 1575

Mobile: 041958 7139

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